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Date/Time Formatting

Introduction

The PilotFish Date/Time Formatter in our Data Mapper is a powerful tool for reformatting date/time strings. By defining the structure of both the input and output dates, PilotFish is able to instantly transform the format without loosing any data.

If unfamiliar with date/time patterns, defining one may seem intimidating at first, however they are really quite simple. A date/time pattern is a series of characters that refer to different components of the date & time. For example, M is for the month, y for the year, h for the hour, etc.

NOTE: It is important to remember that date/time patterns are case-sensitive. For example, M is month, while m is minute.

A common date/time format example is: 2018-01-01 13:01:01.123. That string has all the main components of a date/time format: year, month, day, hour, minute, second, millisecond. As a pattern, it would be: yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS. It’s important to note the capital H, which is used for hours in the 24-hour format. AM/PM uses the lower-case h.

All Pattern Characters

The following is a list of all pattern characters. PilotFish supports all the patterns from Java’s SimpleDateFormat API.

Letter

Date or Time Component

Presentation

Examples
G Era designator Text AD
y Year Year 1996; 96
Y Week year Year 2009; 09
M Month in year (context sensitive) Month July; Jul; 07
L Month in year (standalone form) Month July; Jul; 07
w Week in year Number 27
W Week in month Number 2
D Day in year Number 189
d Day in month Number 10
F Day of week in month Number 2
E Day name in week Text Tuesday; Tue
u Day number of week (1 = Monday, …, 7 = Sunday) Number 1
a Am/pm marker Text PM
H Hour in day (0-23) Number 0
k Hour in day (1-24) Number 24
K Hour in am/pm (0-11) Number 0
h Hour in am/pm (1-12) Number 12
m Minute in hour Number 30
s Second in minute Number 55
S Millisecond Number 978
z Time zone General time zone Pacific Standard Time; PST; GMT-08:00
Z Time zone RFC 822 time zone -0800
X Time zone ISO 8601 time zone -08; -0800; -08:00

More Information

For more information, please check the Java documentation on date formatting at this link: Simple Date Format

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